Museum of Aviation

The Museum of Aviation is located at Robins Air Force Base in Warner-Robins, Georgia. It is situated on 51 acres adjacent to the base, and is the second largest in the U.S. Air Force museum system. Robins AFB is located in middle Georgia, 100 miles south of Atlanta and 16 miles south of Macon.

It is accredited by the American Association of Museums, and is one of only seven aviation facilities in the United States to earn such a professional distinction.


Museum of Aviation at Robins Air Force Base, Georgia
(staff photo)

It is a huge, beautiful facility, and spans several buildings and exhibit areas, including:

  • Eagle Building
  • Hangar 1 - Vietnam
  • Hangar 2 - Century of Flight
  • Hangar 3 - WWII Scott Exhibit Hangar
  • Georgia Aviation Hall of Fame
  • The Tuskeegee Pioneers & Beyond
  • 483rd Bombarment Group exhibits
  • 14th Air Force Flying Tigers
  • Flying the Hump in WWII
  • Outdoor exhibit areas
  • and many more exhibits and tributes

Aircraft on Display

A vast array of historical aircraft, vehicles, engines, missiles and other artifacts are displayed.

Entrance to Hangar One, Vietnam era aircraft
Entrance to Hangar One, housing Vietnam era aircraft
(staff photo)

This is a small list of highlights of the more than 90 vintage planes that are on display:

  • Boeing B-25 Mitchell
  • Boeing B-29 Superfortress
  • B-1B Lancer
  • C-47 Skytrain
  • C-54 Skymaster
  • C-60A Lodestar
  • KC-97L Tanker
  • C-119 Flying Boxcar
  • C-141 Starlifter
  • P-40N Warhawk
  • P-51 Mustang
  • F-84E Thunderjet
  • F-102 Delta Dagger
  • F-105D Thunderchief
  • F-111 Aardvark
  • F-4D Phantom II
  • F-16A Falcon
  • SR-71 Blackbird
  • and the list goes on and on!

Admission, Parking and Hours

We highly recommend a visit for aviation enthusiasts, and anyone with an interest in vintage aircraft and the United States Air Force history. It truly is an incredible facility well worth visiting.

It is physically located 10 miles east of I-75 exit 144. The official address is Georgia Highway 247 & Russell Parkway, Warner Robins, GA 31088.

A gate pass onto Robins AFB is NOT required to visit. See map below for detailed location and driving directions.

Parking and admission is free.


Eagle Building, South Entrance, Museum of Aviation
(staff photo)

It is open daily 9:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m., and closed on New Years Day, Easter Day, Thanksgiving Day, and Christmas Day. Also available is an extensive, well-stocked gift shop, as well as The Victory Cafe.

Scenic Freedom Park, a picnic area complete with pavilions and restrooms, is located on the grounds for use by visiting groups and families. It also caters to special groups, events, meetings and conferences, and rents several rooms and spaces of varying sizes.

Visitors can take self-guided tours of the facility. Guided tours are also available.

Phone 478.926.6870 for detailed information, or visit the official website of the Museum of Aviation.

On our last visit in September of 2013, we spent nearly three hours touring the buildings and grounds. But the exhibits are so extensive and well done, that one could easily spend an entire day, and still not see everything.

Photo Highlights

Entrance area at the Museum of Aviation at Robins Air Force Base, Warner-Robins, Georgia
Museum of Aviation at Robins Air Force Base, with two hangars in the background
Flags in the outdoor area, with two hangars in the background
Interior view of the Eagle Building
Interior view of the Eagle Building
B-1B Lancer
B-1B Lancer
A-10A Warthog 305, Major David A. Flippo
A-10A Warthog 305, Major David A. Flippo
B-29 Superfortress, S/N 44-84053
B-29 Superfortress, S/N 44-84053
P-40N Warhawk, S/N 42-105927
P-40N Warhawk, S/N 42-105927
F-80C
F-80C
T-33A Shooting Star, S/N 53-5199, Buzz Number TR-199
T-33A Shooting Star, S/N 53-5199, Buzz Number TR-199
P-51D Mustang "Ferocious Frankie"
P-51D Mustang "Ferocious Frankie"
F-84E Thunderjet, S/N 51-604, Buzz Number FS-604A
F-84E Thunderjet, S/N 51-604, Buzz Number FS-604A
USAF B-52D Stratofortress, S/N 55-0085
USAF B-52D Stratofortress, S/N 55-0085
F-105D Thunderchief S/N 62-4259
F-105D Thunderchief S/N 62-4259
Lockheed SR-71 Blackbird S/N 61-7958
Lockheed SR-71 Blackbird S/N 61-7958
Lockheed C-141C, 65-0248, of the AFRC, March Air Force Base
Lockheed C-141C, 65-0248, of the AFRC, March Air Force Base
F-102A Delta Dagger S/N 56-1151, Buzz Number FC-151
USAF F-102A Delta Dagger S/N 56-1151, Buzz Number FC-151
C-124C Globemaster II, S/N 51-089
Air Force C-124C Globemaster II, S/N 51-089
C-119 Flying Boxcar, S/N 51-2566
C-119 Flying Boxcar, S/N 51-2566
Lockheed C-60A Lodestar, 42-55918, "Classy Chassy"
Lockheed C-60A Lodestar, 42-55918, "Classy Chassy"
B-25J Mitchell, S/N 44-86872, "The Little King"
B-25J Mitchell, S/N 44-86872, "The Little King"

Robins Air Force Base History

The 1935 Wilcox-Wilson bill provided for construction of new army air logistics depots, and in the early 1940s Macon civic leaders, led by Mayor Charles Bowden and supported by Congressman Carl Vinson, convinced the War Department to locate an airfield near Macon. In June 1941, the War Department approved the construction of a depot in middle Georgia dairy-farm country near the Southern Railroad whistle-stop of Wellston. The site was chosen because of its flat lands, artesian water, proximity to a main rail line, and abundant and cheap land and labor.

Robins Army Air Field, circa 1944
Robins Army Air Field, circa 1944

Known as the Georgia Air Depot in the beginning, the installation was officially named Robins Field in January of 1942 in honor of Brig. Gen. Augustine Warner Robins, a one of the Army Air Corps' first general staff officers. The town of Wellston was renamed Warner-Robins. Throughout World War II, over 23,000 employees at Robins repaired almost every kind of Army Air Force (AAF) aircraft, including B-17s, C-47s, B-29s, B-24s, P-38s, P-47s, and P-51s.

Its training facilities turned out nearly 60,000 field repair mechanics for every theater of war. The workforce supplied every kind of part necessary to keep AAF planes flying, and maintained thousands of parachutes, aircraft electronic and radio systems, and AAF small arms.

The decades following World War II were a time of change for the base. By March 1946 only 3,900 employees remained. Robins AFB served as a repair facility for B-29s during World War II and after the war a large number of B-29s were put in long-term storage at Robins where they remained until the outbreak of the Korean War when they were returned to service. During the Korean War, Robins workers retooled and fitted hundreds of mothballed B-29 Superfortresses.

Robins later played a key role in the Vietnam War, supplying troops and materiel through the Southeast Asian Pipeline and modifying AC-119G/K and AC-130 gunships. Also playing a role were the C-141, the C-130, the C-123, and the C-124 cargo aircraft, all of which were maintained at Robins. In 1973 these same C-141s supported the resupply of Israel in the Yom Kippur War. In October 1983 C-130s from Robins supported U.S. forces in Grenada. In 1990-91, during the Persian Gulf War, Robins provided record numbers of parts, repairs, and personnel to coalition forces in the Persian Gulf. Robins-maintained F-15 Eagles and the E-8 Joint STARS played key roles in defeating the Iraqi military.

Today, Robins Air Force Base is the home of Warner Robins Air Logistics Center, the 78th Air Base Wing, and more than 60 other units that make up a vital part of the Air Force warfighting team. It is the largest industrial complex in Georgia, employing a workforce of over 25,584 civilians, contractors, and military members. Robins AFB has the largest runway in Georgia and is capable of accommodating the world's largest aircraft, including the C-5B.

Area Map of Warner-Robins, Georgia

The map below shows the location of the Museum of Aviation in the Warner-Robins. It is physically located 10 miles east of I-75 exit 144. The official address is Georgia Highway 247 & Russell Parkway, Warner Robins, GA 31088. Phone 478.926.6870 for detailed information, or visit the official website of the Museum of Aviation.



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